Monday, 7 December 2020

Kitchen Island

One of my regular customers contacted me the other day about some work they wanted doing - they needed an island unit for their kitchen. 

They had already chosen some granite for the top and needed a base. We discussed their requirements then I priced it and made it to their specifications. As it was painted I made it using tulip wood (which takes a finish brilliantly), with good quality ply for the shelves. 





 

This was it ready to go, finished woodwork in my workshop. 

Really pleased with how this turned out. I also shortened their kitchen table as well (altering the frame and the top). The unit seems to work well in the room. 

As well as my Etsy products I also have another commission I've been working on which I'm really keen to share with you all soon!

Who else could do with a unit like this in their kitchen?

15 comments:

  1. i sure wish you lived by me. i could keep you permanently employed!

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  2. Tulip wood? Looks rather like what we call poplar over here.

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    1. You know I normally refer to it as poplar until the other day on twitter I got corrected and told that there are many types of poplar and tulip refers the specific genus that is used for timber as there are so many types out there. I prefer it to pine for the lack of knots on painted jobs. All depends on budget though as it is normally more expensive.

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    2. Poplar became a favored wood for painted finish interior door and window trim here about thirty years ago as the quality of eastern white pine went down hill and prices went up with the advent of the big box stores. They were harvesting small diameter planted trees and the stuff was full of knots, much of it Georgia-Pacific branded Canadian production. Now most of the paint grade trim is the same junk pine but its all finger jointed pre-primed to get around the knots. Many especially in big developments have gone to pre-painted MDF trim. But it just does not stand up to the usual abuse. Poplar is suitable for indoor use where it remains dry, but rots quickly in any out door application where it can get wet.

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  3. Is that Tulipifera? Lime tree? (So called because it grows in lime soils.) If so its great stuff to carve in as well.

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    1. Liriodendron tulipifera - I did use some the other day as a practice piece for some carving I was doing for a tiny commission I was mocking up. Took detail well. I think most is imported from the eastern USA.
      I love it compared to pine for painted jobs as there is very few knots and it finishes beauifully.

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  4. Very smart and a lovely finish. I like functional and beautiful pieces of furniture. I too wish you lived in my area, getting good trades folk is a nightmare here.

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  5. I second those comments from Jaz and Diane - getting hold of 'a man' these days is becoming more difficult. For some reason nobody seems to actually want the work. Really nice job on that island unit Kev, but I'm afraid I wouldn't want one in my kitchen, I've got little enough room already without having to negociate islands as well!

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  6. I have quite a bit of lovely carpentry work on my wish list! Do you travel to Pennsylvania USA? Probably not, at least not now. I think international travel is right out. You did a stunning job on that island, it is a beauty!

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  7. Oh they are handy! Mine will be precisely sized to the width of an antique butcher block that I brought home. Do you deliver? :)

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