Thursday 28 December 2023

First Diabetic Christmas

Diabetes is a constant current in our life. It is always there, pinging up on our phone when levels hit low or high, or asking what her levels are before we eat. 

Injections 4 or more times a day. 

Christmas day it certainly hits a bit harder. 

She is so controlled day to day, since diagnoses she has cut out snacking (unless she's low), eats sensibly all the time, I've never caught her sneaking food or being silly with what she eats. 

Christmas day all she wanted to do was stuff her face with some of the chocolate she'd been given like her siblings, but she had to show constraint, and did it so well. It's hard for me to remember that she's just 11 at times, as she acts so mature with it. She managed to have some chocolates, keep her levels in control (although a bit high for some of the day), we split dinner and pudding so she could have her insulin in two separate hits and spread it out.

 

Working out the carbs for Christmas lunch is a maths test in itself. I found this page afterwards, my wife had written out for everything on the plate). We tend to work out the carbs accurately for a meal then adapt it to others. For a meal this big it's tricky to get right, even then the ratios of insulin to carbs changes so much it can never be perfect. 

So here's to our first diabetic Christmas, it makes everything more tricky, but it's easier together. 

9 comments:

  1. It is hard when 1 child has a different diet, she is doing well, and you need to take credit as well, you raised her to be sensible when needed. Our 3 grandchildren all under 6 love chocolate, but the younger 2 are dairy free, so they can't tuck in as much as their older brother. We keep both types of chocolate here, not that they normally eat much.

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    1. I have dietary requirements - can't have dairy and wife can't have soya! One reason why home cooking is best!

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  2. When I was diagnosed in 2001 (type 2 I hasten to add) I was told "carbohydrates are your friend" by the Diabetic Professional. Now things have changed, and carbs are not our "friend" but protein is apparently. I am impressed with his well you have adjusted as a family and hats off to your daughter, so impressed with her.

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    1. What we find is if I do a zero carb meal, but high protein, she'll spike a few hours later as the body turns that protein into what it needs.

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  3. Sounds like you need a degree in food science - or will qualify for one by the time all this has become 'second nature'.

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    1. Certainly feels like we're working towards one!

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  4. It's so commendable to see how well she has adjusted. It must feel daunting at times, but thankfully, she has loving support surrounding her. Blessings to you all!

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    1. Yeah, I dread to think what it's like for some families that aren't lucky enough to have the time like we do, or even being financially stable, we still haven't had our allowance from the governement yet for having a disabled child and she was diagnosed in Feburary. It's not cheap being diabetic, lucky we don't have to pay for the meds as well!

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